Does Blazor Have A Future In .NET Web Application Development?

Blazor is Microsoft’s new web framework that uses C# and WebAssembly to run .NET code inside the browser. It may only be in beta, but there are already plenty of reasons to be excited about it.

First, it means that you can download one file and have both your server-side code in ASP.NET Core MVC running on the backend, in addition to being able to call .NET consultants Sydney from Blazor running on the browser side at the same time! Second, it eliminates cross-browser compatibility issues because everything uses standards-compliant technologies like WebAssembly or WebGL.

Blazor is a fully open-source project developed by a team of four at Microsoft, and it leverages a ton of existing .NET libraries out of the box. Blazor even has an experimental desktop client that calls into the same server-side application running on ASP.NET Core MVC!

There are many reasons to be excited about Blazor. However, there are many questions surrounding Blazor as well. This post will look at both sides to see a future for Blazor in .NET web development.

Blazor Has A Lot of Unknowns

The biggest issue with Blazor is that it still has so many unknowns about it. It doesn’t even use an existing ASP.NET project template, so it’s unclear what kind of other features may come with it or if there are any at all.

Blazor currently uses WebPack to bundle up everything together. You can also use other bundlers, but I’m assuming that WebPack is the way forward. It’s a simple approach that works well for most projects with good performance and small size. However, there are still many edge cases about Blazor and WebPack. Will Blazor always be in beta? Will you need a server-side web app to start? If so, all this happens with ASP.

Larry

Hi, I am Larry, I had been a professional in SEO content marketing for more than a decade and have been training similar people under me with the same professional approach and problem-solving attitude at work.

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